Skip to main content Skip to main content

Honoring: Retrievers

Honoring: Retrievers

Jim Fulks

RETRIEVERS
This tip is from Jim Fulks of Coyote Creek Retrievers, 83574 Territorial Highway, Eugene, OR 97405; (541) 485-7887; coyotecrk2@aol.com. Jim has been training professionally for 20 years, specializing in training retrievers for hunting and hunt tests. He breeds Labradors.

Honoring
"In a waterfowling situation with two dogs, both dogs should sit or lie where their owners position them, whether beside the blind or elsewhere, and not leave to retrieve until sent," Jim said. "The owners, not the dogs, should determine which dog retrieves and when. Otherwise, both dogs will try to retrieve the same bird, which can lead to dog fights and mangled birds."


Jim said the prerequisites for training a retriever to honor are: e-collar conditioning, basic obedience (reinforced with the e-collar), force-fetch training, and extensive experience in retrieving marked birds from land and water and steadiness. Actually, honoring is just an extension of steadiness.

"When a dog is steady, he's ready to start honoring," Jim said.


Jim starts by using a pinch-collar and lead to restrain the dog on honor. He also cues the dog that he is to honor by saying "No bird! Sit! Stay!" In a hunt-test situation, he kneels down beside his honoring dog, whereas he stands when his is the working dog. These subtleties help the dog understand when he's to retrieve and when he's to hang tight with the boss.

Honoring: Pointers


Don't miss part one of this story, available here.

 

When his dog no longer needs the pinch-collar and lead, Jim relies on the e-collar (at a high setting) to correct breaks.

"Creeping can be a real problem, with a high-rolling retriever," he said. "We correct it with leash corrections, the sit command and sometimes the e-collar. We sometimes put the dog on the 'place board' and correct him whenever he creeps off the board."

Jim stressed that, in both training and hunting, you should avoid working your dog with another dog that is unsteady, hyperactive or noisy.

Such a bracemate can undo all your hard work in a very short time. He also stressed that, while hunting, you yourself can un-train your dog if in your anxiety to collect every bird you shoot, you allow him to break repeatedly. If he figures out that he must be steady in training but can break when hunting, you'll have a real problem to deal with.

To Continue Reading

Go Premium Today.

Get everything Gun Dog has to offer. What's Included

  • Receive (6) 120-page magazines filled with the best dog training advice from expert trainers

  • Exclusive bird dog training videos presented by Gun Dog experts.

  • Complete access to a library of digital back issues spanning years of Gun Dog magazine.

  • Unique editorial written exclusively for premium members.

  • Ad-free experience at GunDogMag.com.

Subscribe Now

Already a subscriber? Sign In or start your online account

Get the Newletter Join the List and Never Miss a Thing.

Get the top Gun Dog articles delivered right to your inbox.

Phone Icon

Get Digital Access.

All Gun Dog subscribers now have digital access to their magazine content. This means you have the option to read your magazine on most popular phones and tablets.

To get started, click the link below to visit mymagnow.com and learn how to access your digital magazine.

Get Digital Access

Not a Subscriber?
Subscribe Now